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and congress back in 1968 actually made them the law of the land, but they don't apply to 40% of the gun sales today. something like 58,000 gun dealers across this country, three times the number of mcdonald's stores, as a matter of fact, there are gun stores every place in this country, and those gun sellers -- they do background checks on all their clients. i think last year 78,000 times the government found reasons to deny people a permit to get a gun based on either they were criminals or they had mental problems. if that doesn't tell you that this is a real problem but good checks can really do something, i don't know what would. >> let me ask you about in new york the nra has filed a suit to try to defeat some of these gun control measures which are more robust than what the federal government is talking about within the states that are about magazines, about background checks and assault weapons. how do you react to that? >> well, anybody has the right to go to court and sue over anything. and in new york lots of people do that every single day. but the supreme court, which is the one t
's proposition eight. let's start with doma. it's the federal law that defines marriage as a union between and a man and a woman. it keeps gays from get iting th same rights. president clinton signed doma into law in 1996. he now says it should be struck down. avery freedman from cleveland, good to e see you. >> hi, fredricka. >> and richard herman, good to see you as well. avery, you first on this. two cases before the supreme court. let's begin with doma. how much is at stake here? >> i think this is one of the great cases that the the supreme court will hear this term. that and prop eight. but doma which was compromised legislation and signed by bill clinton back in 1996 has always been questionable in terms of constitutionality. and two federal appeals courts have held that that law that restricts personnel rights that is by the federal government violates the constitution. it violates the equal protection law. in terms of the significance of it, it's really march madness. this is so important and so exciting because you have the solicitor general arguing against the constitutionality
. the supremes are hearing arguments on a new law that civil rights advocates. it is getting hot in the court and in the spin. it is a book that says take me with you. when did you know that grandma was the one? when her sister dumped me. grandpa was my dad a good athlete? no. oh dad, you remember my friend alex? yeah. the one that had the work done... good to see you. where do we go when we die? the ground. who's your girlfriend? his name is chad. and that's where babies come from. [ male announcer ] sometimes being too transparent can be a bad thing. this looks good! [ male announcer ] but not with the oscar mayer deli fresh clear pack. it's what you see is what you get food. it's oscar mayer. it's what you see is what you get food. guten tag. greetings earthlings. how you doin'? hola. sup. yello. howdy. what's crackalackin? it is great we express ourselves differently. if we were all the same, life would be boring. so get to know people who aren't like you. you'll appreciate what makes us different. the more you know. >>> the supreme court heard arguments today in a dispute over arizona's
? if you guys get over the racism, it is the law. get over it. the people who killed the people interact, it is the law. -- in iraq. host: what is the affordable care act have to do with racism ? caller: it has a lot to do with racism, taking her -- taking care of people -- we should cut the healthcare for the congress. see how they like it. we will move onto clay in biloxi, mississippi. caller: good morning. disabilityd and on after working 14 years, the five years of court reporting. we had a bombardment of advertisements for simple move -- healthcare for medicare. we find it replaces the medicare policy we currently have. after the deadline passed for the supplements, humana stopped advertising in mississippi. you can't get in touch with humana. the bureaucracy is just going to increase and as leaving the poor tople at a disadvantage correct and try to make reasonable choices for their healthcare. thank you for taking my call. host: a statement put out yesterday by the office of house democratic -- released following the statement today in recognition of the third anniversary of the a
, and the ability to get a job. not just because they are present in violation of the law but because they have a criminal record. this is a recipe for disaster that is irresponsible and unjustified. to make matters worse, many of these individuals lack the money, family, support and the ability to get a job, not just because they are present in violation of the law, but because they have a right -- a criminal record ultimately, the nonsensical action demonstrates the inability and a lack of desire on behalf of the administration to enforce the law, even against illegal immigrants convicted of serious crimes. we learned that 72% of the people released an okra record at all. another 21% had convictions for one or two misdemeanors only. unless to rector martin, who we welcome here today, tells us something different, this means that 93% of the people released by ice were not criminals or low, low level offenders. second, the title of the as for whether this was motivated by policy or politics, from my investigations, i don't believe it was either. i don't believe it was policy because we have no
that the job market out there. be the even more fearful than during the recession, which is the law. they're even less like a quit even though we should've expected a big increase in the recovery started. the more reason you can get that water level up even though you're adding a slaughter is because the number of jobs in terms of points is even lower than normal. one measure of how hard it is is to get the number of hires each month compared to the number of people unemployed and looking as well as the number of people who lived given up looking for work. you can see how the ratio has gone up and pretty much been stuck since 2009. we haven't really seen the number of jobs out there matching the number of people who are looking for work. and that gives you some idea of why this quit rate has not gone up, white state so though. people have said good idea of how hard it is to go and find a job. there's two groups of people being hurt the most. people at 55 and they basically lose their jobs there's a lot of trouble trying to find it and also very young people who are in train the job market
stricter gun control laws in a lot of places, in western states that are supposedly so libertarian and free-wheeling. i think it's going to be a long haul. i'm glad we have a billionaire on this issue. >> did you notice colorado what it did last week? a gun state, a hunting state. once reliably red. a transformational change. >> i think colorado is a good example. i grew up in that state, it definitely is a hunting-friendly state. i only lived in sweet states, strategic. >> there's some ohio blood in there? >> i'm going to move there for a while so i can say, i used to live in ohio, it's a swing state. you're seeing it in colorado where this is going. states are responsive on a local level. politics is all about pressure and leverage. for somebody like a mary landrieu, she doesn't see as a national poll as necessarily the pressure that's going to change her election. she's worried about louisiana. she's worried about getting re-elected in that state. and until you see the zeitgeist change within the state, these politicians are not responsive to that. where bloomberg can make a huge differe
is a highly regarded securities lawyer, a professor at the university of san diego law school, and an expert on sarbanes-oxley. >> the idea was to have a criminal statute in place that would make ceos and cfos think twice, think three times, before they signed their names attesting to the accuracy of financial statements or the viability of internal controls. >> and this law has not been used at all in the financial crisis? >> it hasn't been used to go after wall street. it hasn't been used for these kinds of cases at all. >> why not? >> i don't know. i don't have a good answer to that question. i hope that it will be used. i think there clearly are instances where ceos and cfos signed financial statements that said there were adequate controls, and there weren't adequate controls. but i can't explain why it hasn't been used yet. >> we told partnoy about eileen foster's allegations of widespread mortgage fraud at countrywide and efforts to prevent the information from reaching her, the federal government, and the board of directors--in violation of the company's internal controls. i mean, th
. that is under current law, the law the president supports. he changed to make that, so it is financially feasible. our program would move us in the direction of premium support, which is what members of congress have. it will allow for a certain amount of money subsidy, a benefit check, if you will, for seniors to be able to utilize that to purchase what they want for themselves so they are able to have an insurance program that is much more responsive to them. as a physician, medicare patients are having a whale of a time finding doctors to take medicare. if you are a new medicare patients and your doctor prior to the agencies the five does not take medicare patients, you have a very difficult time finding a new dr. who will take a new medicare patient. one out of every three doctors in this country have limited the number of patients they are seeing. see no of every eight medicare patients at all. the program is flawed and needs to be reformed. we need to strengthen medicare. our guest,rice is republican of georgia. we are talking about budgetary matters. the numbers are on the screen.
husband john quincy adams and the complex relationship with her mother-in-law, abigail adams. we will include your questions and comments by facebook and twitter tonight. >> the republican party released a plan this morning for its approach to the next presidential election that deals with attracting minority and women voters. announced this. these comments are just under one hour. >> i appreciate that introduction. thank you for the introduction of in welcoming us to the press club. i know most of you came for eggs and coffee but thank you for staying for the speech. i want to recognize our co- chair sharon day and are treasurer tony day. day. our treasurer tony all, i you and most of want to think and how grateful i am to this opportunity project. their work cut brings us here today. i want to introduce them this morning. henry barbara of mississippi, glenn mccall of south carolina, former whitew, and house press secretary ari fleischer. when republicans lost in november, it was a wake-up call. in response, i initiated the most public and most, free handson if post election rev
, it was a law professor and a community organizer. and i think he was probably a liberal from the jump. and ted cruise comes out of a different political atmosphere. texas is very different from chicago he has the experience and the background of a guy who made it from scratch in the state of texas, which is -- you know low tax opportunity state. and you see the effect it's had on these two men, not that they wouldn't have those convictions anyway you can see it. >> bill: the nation is going to have to decide i think in the next four years what kind of country they want. because this is not going to be able to compromised. it's too big. brit hume, everybody, living large down there in miami. if you need any help, brit, call us tonight and we will help you out. directly ahead, a grizzly murder in colorado. will the woman beat the rap? there she is. big beef tonight. those reports after these messages. what's droid-smart ? with google now, it automatically knows when you need to leave for the airport, how much traffic there is, and can have your boarding pass ready. the droid razr maxx hd by moto
movement. a year later, a couple in minnesota was denied a marriage license because state law limited marriage to persons of the opposite sex. their case made to the u.s. supreme court back in 1972. it was dismissed without so much as a written opinion. the court ruled that same sex couples have no constitutional rights married and that the legal challenge itself failed to raise a substantial federal question at all. but the struggle continued. it would be another 14 years before the supreme court would issue a major ruling on civil rights for gay americans in bour versus hard wig. in the summer of 1982, michael baurs was arrested and charged by atlanta police by committing a private act with another adult man in his own bedroom. his case made it to the high court in 1986 where georgia's law criminalizing adult gay male couples for engaging in private consensual sexual acts was upheld. it was not until 203 that that decision was overruled when the court recognized the constitutional right to privacy for lesbian and gay individuals. the struggle still continues. ten years after bowers,
people witnessed the crime and did not step in. ohio has a law that if you witness a crime you must report it. there are many more that need to be charged for this. >> michael: lou shapiro when you hear that, ohio does have this law. it's a felony not to report a crime. it's seldom invoked. i went to school with an honor system. if you saw someone cheat you're as culpable as the cheater. >> the general public is not always expected to know what is a crime and what is not a crime. when someone is faced with a question, did you see the person may say, i didn't see it that way or it didn't hit me that way that's why it's not typically invoked. >> michael: as a defense attorney now. let's say--i'm going to give a hypothetical. these two kids were convicted. you're representing one of the people who are under surveillance by these grand juries under possible indictment. what do you say to the grand jury? what do you have your clients say here? at this point this case has been adjudicated. >> i would advise my client to play it as close to the vest as possible. if he hold out long enough
crowds with tear gas and riot greer. protesters are against the proposed law allowing same-sex couples to marry. french lawmakers approved the bill for everyone last month. it's up for a vote in the senate come april. >>> a week from easters and tenses of thousands gather to hear the new pope lead palm sunday prayers. ♪ the pope broke with tradition at the start of the ceremony, greeting the crowd in an open jeep instead of a bulletproof pope mobile. during his message pope francis urged followers to shun corruption and greed. >>> have you noticed that your gas is cheaper? we're on a four-week streak where gas prices are on a steady decline. the lundberg survey reports the national average is 3.71 for a gallon of regular unleaded. that's 22 cents cheaper than a year ago this week. the most expensive gas is in chicago. cheapest is in billings, montana. >>> a pre-historic's family's road trip rose to the top of the box office this weekend. >> my name is eep and this is my family, the croods. he's been in a cave forever. >> three days is not forever. >> it earned more than $44 million.
mean, because of this difficulty of getting these federal laws, some states have already started passing their own. colorado's governor signed the law there yesterday. we saw the very sweeping law in new york, although already they've had to back off a little bit on magazines because the problem is they didn't actually manufacture the kind of magazines they were talking about. having said that, rana, could this be where this debate is shifting? joe biden's somewhat optimistic belief notwithstanding. >> i think so. i think new york is going to get attention no matter what because of mayor bloomberg being involved in this issue. again, i hope he continues strongly down this path because i think he has the power to sort of look across both sides of the aisle and really bring some unity here. i think it's interesting that some of these western states are actually moving ahead and passing laws. i think that goes to the point that we have this idea that, you know, particularly in the west and in the south that gun control has always been a big libertarian issue, that we have this very
dollar it seems that we spend, leave the president's health care law in place, put new regulations on main street. and this is what will get -- what we'll get more of. family will continue to fall further and further behind. families who are looking for a job, who either drop out completely an give up working, or they're forced onto food stamps. families that watched wall street grow wealthier as they gain, what, $10 a month in their paycheck? the republican budget changes the course of not just our financial position of the country, it changes the course of our economy. adding immediately 1% growth, closing that growth gap here in this first year. arding more income, $1,500 to a family. over the next 10 years, doing dramatically more, both for families to come. that's what the republican budget is about, about chaining the growth gap, closing it, giving our families a fighting chance again. i reserve the balance of my time. the chair: the gentleman reserves. the gentlelady from new york. ms. ma low mi: i grant seven minutes to a new member of the joint economic committee, john del
put up. again, we know that these budgets respect going to become law. so, why the exercise? what's the point? >> definitely this broke all records for a vote a rama, what we call these extensive 13-hour-long debates, more than 100 amendments that were considered. but it's -- working the will of the senate, frankly. and it also, one of the things that's key we focus on is some of the amendments that did or didn't pass because they are going to be used in some of these elections in 2014 in terms of the keystone pipeline, for example. that amendment did pass. >> bill, anna brings up a significant point, a lot of folks who have been talking about this idea that the lion's share of what we saw unfold last night over on c-span, a lot of that was designed for campaign ads a lot was just for campaign commercials what does that say about the budget process? >> it is actually moving forward because the democrats have finally said they do support raising tax, only on the wealthy americans but esensely, what's changed, they didn't pass a budget for four years, any budget threat they passed w
the full spectrum of constitutional conservativism, including life and marriage and the rule of law. [applause] on the life question. it is simple. i went through the toughest election of my life last fall. i had cameras around me from st. patrick's day to november 6. they were trying to get a second or a minute to run against me in a single ad. they did not get one second, by the way. of they are in the business try to say i did not back up any issue. we battled against life. is human life sacred in all of its forms? yes, it is. at one moment does life begin? at conception. the people on the other side of this question dare not answer either one of those question, they know they lose the debate. i stood on life and i stood on marriage. [applause] and the thing that a bunch of people are backing away from these challenge don't seem to realize, i'm still standing. [applause] why is that? i did not run a campaign on jobs in the economy, jobs in the economy, and beat that drum until i beat people into sleep. that is part of it but the rest of this has to be added together or we can nev
of law. [applause] and on the life question, it's really pretty simple. i went through the toughest election of my life last fall. i had tracking cameras around me from st. patrick's day until november 6th, one to three cameras always focused on me trying to get a second or a minute that they could run against me in an ad. they didn't get a single second that they could run against me, not one second, by the way. [applause] but they're in the business of trying to undermine and weaken us, and i didn't back up on any principle. we debated the issue of life, and i said my opponent, my leftist opponent cannot answer two questions on life. is human life sacred in all of its forms? yes, it is. and at what moment does life begin? the instant of conception. and the people on the other side of this question dare not answer either one of those questions. they know they lose the debate. i stood on life, and i stood on marriage -- [applause] and the thing that a bunch of people that have been backing away from these challenges don't seem to realize that i'm still standing. [applause] now, why
. as paul barrett writes in his book, "glock -- the rise of america's gun" shootouts on the set of "law & order" were featuring this austrian import. >> some of the american companies will want to know will our guns be in the hands of good guys or bad guys. glock just said go ahead and put it in the movie. we don't care. >> that's a porcelain gun made in germany. it costs more than you make in a month. >> almost every part of that speech in "die hard 2" is factually wrong, but when there were fears that an undetectable gun could show up in america, sales skyrocketed. barrett said glock saw an opportunity. >> when the law was enacted, it was enacted with a grandfather clause, meaning everything that existed before the day of enactment was still illegal. this left glock with a huge supply of prebanned equipment that was still legal to sell, which the company then dribbled out over time. and the dark glamour of the glock, you know, went up. because gun aficionados resented the resfrings that's the gun they don't want me to have, i want two of them. >> thanks to a perfectly legal trade-in p
, and now communications services that serve the public interest. that is the mandate they wrote into law to guide the fcc. is it in the public interest for people in rural areas to hospital, their local government services, family members, and others? the fcc is under both republican and democratic chairman have said yes, it is. host: on twitter -- are there steps you can give about where this program is most use? and the roleline internet connections? on the fcc website, the their reports on all these programs a go into great detail about where they're provided, how much, and where. universalder the service administrative company and their required to disclose where and who gets the service. that is how they have found out through these reforms, that there were a number people getting the service who were not qualified. as withgo to fcc.ogv, oft things, and the pages material and statistics, the universal service fund, enter that into the search box, the universal service fund, and it will take you to the pages. host: stats from the universal service administrative program. 110 million
the permits. while it may not be a form law retail the board can consider the arguments made by the neighbors but i would suggest that is the permit that would be on appeal to the board on may 15th, which deals with the actual change of use and the establishment of an oska at that location. additionally, if somehow, they open additional stores such that they have eleven stores operating the day that this comes before the board, then they would be considered formula retail use, the board would apply the law of the day and would i believe, deny the permit because it would not have it would be a formula retail use and not have the appropriate lease authorization and the board has to apply the law of the day when you hear the permit that is before you. so, but it does not sound like that is a possibility given that they don't have enough stores in the pipeline to trigger the threshold in the next couple of months. because of that we found that it is not formula retail. and available for any questions. >> i have a quick question on the pop up stores. what do those count as? >> those are generally
dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. and make your business dream a reality. but that doesn't mean i don't want to make money.stor. i love making money. i try to be smart with my investments. i also try to keep my costs down. what's your plan? ishares. low cost and tax efficient. find out why nine out of ten large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> this morning my question. what are 30,000 students in chicago supposed to do now? plus, obama care three years later. and the secretly recorded nypd stop and frisk bombshell. but first, this is not a test. we are experiencing a serious uterus emergency. ♪ good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. ladies, it is time to gird your loins again. remember that hibt that we dropped to the national republican lawmakers on election day, the one that responded to their attempts to man handl
ground in the years to come that real money can be put behind a gun law reform message, and it can be a winning message. the fact of the matter is, i watchedway lapierre call mayor bloomberg nutty this morning. well, wayne lapierre is about as nutty as a bag of trail mix when it comes down to issues like this. the end of the day, you're having this kind of gun violence, it happened on a day after day basis, americans want real change. they want universal background checks. you know, they do want, you know, limits on high capacity magazines. they do want a ban on assault weapons that can fire multiple, multiple rounds without reload. they do want those things. you won't see it in this legislation, but what mayor bloomberg and other mayors around the nation are doing will be a kick in the right direction. >> a lot of opposition from republicans and a number of democrats as well against the assault weapons ban specifically mayor bloomberg on "meet the press" earlier. pretty much saying that it probably won't pass. take ap listen. >> we are going to have a vote for sure on assault weap
to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. and make your business dream a reality. ♪ ♪ we're lucky, it's not every day you find a companion as loyal as a subaru. love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. >> self defense or pre-meditated murder? a arizona jury will have to decide her fate. a foreign sglik psychiatrist hired the defense will be taking the stand. that is all tonight. thanks for being with us. make sure you go to greta wire.com. make sure you know what's going on with us tonight jodi arias trial. good night from washington, d.c. >> this is a fox report. tonight evacuations underway here at the airport in the nation's heartland where a small corporate jet has gone down hitting a group of homes. six months after the killings of libya and three other americans there are new questions tonight about why we have not heard from the people who did escape from that ambush alive. >> survivors from that deadly night terrorist attacked our american diplomatic out post in libya. what do these people know and why don't our
years. it was a law. every reasonable political observer admits the budget control act which had the force of law was a budget, period, but no because it was -- it was not a resolution, it was a law, which is much stronger than any resolution we do here. they have yelled and screamed, as i've indicated. still, republicans pined for the days of the so-called regular order and the senate would vote on a budget resolution that would set spending priorities for the fiscal year. republicans, we were told, we heard, we saw, were desperate to have a budget debate, desperate. let's -- and had charts out here. they were desperate for an amendment. they wanted a vote-a-rama, and they had charts, speeches and demonstrations to prove it. they had, mr. president, press conference after press conference after press conference. they even had a calendar that they brought out here almost daily telling the days since the senate passed a budget resolution -- not a law which was already in effect but a resolution. i was amazed yesterday, i mean amazed, flabbergasted, stunned when republicans blocked
brutality. initially those armed patrols were completely legal. they have studied the law and they knew what distance they needed to stand. when the guns could not be loaded in the cars and when a felon could not carry a handgun and all the very specific legislation around when and where it was legal and they emulated tactics done in l.a. and started to patrol the police and stand up. this is true of the local following. young adults who said that his power. that is standing up. we are going to join in and we are not just going to sit there and talk about the revolution and the revolutionary action movement but this gives us a way to actually stand up against brutality. when this really change to a different scale when they were on patrol in oakland standing up and following the police and patrolling the police. this is changes when the young man was killed in richmond north of oakland and neighbors were killed by the police, shot in the back of there was a lot of evidence that this was an unjustified murder. there was no official recourse. people tried petitions and they tried talking to th
president biden teamed up with new york mayor michael bloomberg today to push for new gun control laws. biden made an emotional appeal for action. >> for all those who say we shouldn't or couldn't ban high capacity magazines, i just ask them one question, think about newtown. think about newtown. think about how many of these children or teachers may be alive today had he had to reload three times as many times as he did. think about what happened out in where gabby giffords, my good friend, was shot and wounded. think about when that young man had to try to change the clip. had he only had a ten-round clip when he changed the clip and fumbled and had it knocked out of his hand, how many more people would have been alive? and tell me how it violates anyone's constitutional right to be limited to a clip that holds ten rounds instead of 30, or in aurora a hundred? >> let's get more on the vice president's emotional appeal for new gun laws. susan candiotti with the speech, the backdrop of new york city, the mayor and involving a number of family members from the connecticut shooting. >> r
. with dustwuns it will be a major election issue for democrats opposing strong gun laws. in other words, the real democrats won't show, which in an off year would be a very bad idea. if there's a credible primary challenge, a vote would absolutely hurt an incumbent democrat. that's from howard green. let's look at they states now. it looks to me, sam, that you have states like out west, i want to see this list of human. pryor in arrange saw, in arc, mary landrieu, kay hagen, there's a lot of senators who have to run in conservative states, mitt romney states. how do they deal with this issue this. >> you know the left, the progressive community hasn't made that much of a stink about the assault weapons ban. that might be because they recognize the political difficulties, but my sense is they recognize the assault weapon is using a very small actual number of violent crimes, violent gun crimes. they think there's studies that suggest it's down to about 2%. they recognize the bill would have a much bigger impact on reducing gun violence. so when i talk to progressives, they don't get caught up over
is that officials here in colorado haven't officially identified the suspect but our local affiliate says their law enforcement sources have told them it is evan spencer ebble. he is a known white supremacist. he was involved in this high speed chase and shoot out. about ten hours drive from here in colorado yesterday in texas. now we do have some home video shot by a viewer at the end of that chase. so let's take a quick listen to that. so, again, this is the end of a high speed chase down in texas. what we know from authorities there is that it was a routine traffic stop. and that's when they say the suspect shot a deputy three times. he led them on a chase, shooting out the window. he crashed into a big rig. he then got out of the car, continued shooting until he was finally shot. he was airlifted to the hospital and was considered brain dead at that time. but what they have been able to do is to suspect that there's some link between the car he was driving there and a car that was spotted here in colorado when the head of the prison department here was shot dead outside his home on tuesday. and
. but the crash didn't stop the driver from getting out of the car and firing away at law enforcement officers. he was shot and killed in the firefight. >> he wasn't planning on being taken alive. i mean, that's obvious that he was trying to hurt somebody and he was trying to hurt the police. >> reporter: the chase started when a sheriff's deputy tried to pull the cadillac over on a remote stretch of texas highway. deputy james boyd was shot twice in the chest. but he was wearing a bulletproof vest, and is expected to survive. that triggered a long, high-speed chase. >> he came by me, i was say going about 100 miles an hour. had his left arm out the window and he was just shooting. he shot four times when he passed by my car parked in the median of the highway. >> reporter: the denver post quoting federal and state officials reports the suspect is 28-year-old evan spencer ebel, a parolee from the denver area. police say he is the focus of the investigation into the murder of tom clements, the director of colorado's prison system. in a press release thursday night el paso county investigators in co
of the public without interference from democracy. there was a time when open records laws public library were both involved in serving a democratic right to know and empowering the people. that was before the library and san francisco government decided that serving the interests of the so-called aeries toe contracts could be turned into a private income stream. ~ you have become so enslaved to private money you decided right to know is a place to save money. if we want a democracy, we need open institutions of knowledge that allow access to the truth. saving money on those institutions of knowledge is like selling our children. it is no accident that the san francisco public library is the most egregious sunshine violator in the city. once it is a private income stream, the philanthropyists want power and exclusivityity. the destruction of democracy is what they expect for the money and if corporate influence can destroy the public library, they can destroy what you care about next. the destruction of truth is the destruction of democracy itself, having me arrested did you not solve society'
mother-in-law, forever -- former first lady abigail adams. tonight at 8:00 eastern on c-span and c-span3. speeches from the weekend meeting of the conservative political action conference. the head of the advocacy group citizens united talked-about car brous's latest efforts to influence republican primaries leading up to the 2014 primary elections. about 15 minutes. >>>> two years ago the president told a lie about the supreme court decision called citizens united. the case struck a huge blow. the president of citizens united is up next. he has proposed document series since 2004. please welcome david bossie. [applause] i'm president of citizens united. it has been a big year, as we celebrate our 25th anniversary. it is great to be back here as we come together for our 40th time. citizens united is doing it again this year, where we get a chance to show off some of the groundbreaking conservative films available today. conservatives need to think of new and innovative ways to develop and deliver our message to a broad our audience. one of those ways is through film. fellow conservatives
of what was lawful and what wasn't lawful and what might we been able to do. formulations committee has jurisdiction. armed services has jurisdiction. that's four committees i can name off the top of my head, mr. speaker. each of them have taken some kind of look into this. here's what happens. if you take a situation like benghazi or any major incident and you break it down into four components and you assign or the jurisdiction of each committee chair would look at this and claim jurisdiction, which they rightfully can do in this congress, they would take their component of it, study it, they might write out a report, and might be complete and it might be completely accurate. they can send that out. the unclassified portion, to the american people. that report goes out. then say that select committee on intel. then, mr. speaker, the foreign affairs committee can meet and they can call their witnesses that they choose to do so, and gather that information and perhaps write a completely objective and completely truthful report, and send it out to the public. all of that that's not class
the committee that was supposed to find all the cuts failed. the sequester came into law. it's an antimilitary provision. it was put in by jack lew, a very liberal member of the president's, at that time, chief of staff for offic office of mot and budget. the president seems to be quite happy to see these cuts fall on the defense department. he seems to be happy to have this happen. why do you say that? i say, because he's done nothing to philadelphia it. -- to fix it except demand something that he has no right to demand. that is, to violate this agreement and raise taxes and spend more. and that's not going to happen. congress is not going to vote to violate the agreement they made with the american people just less than two years ago. if we give in on that, we might as well quit. and our colleagues say they want to have a balanced approach to the budget, and they're going to raise taxes, and most people hear that think that the taxes will be used to reduce the deficit. but it's not. the taxes are going to be used to fund more spending over the agreement we've had in place now for about 18 o
friends and law enforcement have canvassed neighborhoods looking for any clues as to where he could have gone. high school cellphone and credit card and i.d. that police found in his room, his mother says they have no idea where her son might be. >> we really don't know where he is. we have an outpouring of support from the brown community, friends from home, relatives from all over the country. we really miss him and we want him back. >> arthel: the family helping with the search creating a twitter account and facebook page where they post updates. they have had 190,000 views since the page was set up. he is six feet tall, 130 pounds, wearing blue jeans and sports jacket. his glasses philadelphia eagles wool cap. his mother says he has struggled recently with depression, everyone who had contact with him before he disappeared did not find anything out of the ordinary. we spoke to sunil's sister earlier who said it's been very hard on the family. if you have any information please contact the providence police department. 401-272-3132. >> rick: let's hope for good news on that story. art
for a strirkt gun l stricter gun laws was yoko ono. she tweeted out this picture of the bloody glasses john lennon was wearing when he was shot with the statistic that over a million people have been killed by guns in the u.s. since his murder more than 32 years ago. tomorrow marks three years since the legislation was signed into law. the health care legislation. according to congresswoman -- >> did you see this yesterday? sebelius is saying republicans are actually going to help expand medicaid. some governors are making this decision. doesn't john kasich do this in ohio? >> but the house of florida stopped him. >> the governor of florida decided he was going to take the medicaid money but the speaker of the house, who we will try to get on the show because it's an absolutely fascinating, to get him and the president of the senate to come up on the show to talk about it. they decided to actually veto it. >> why? >> because they believe the federal government will pay for it the first couple of years but after that, the cost is dumped on the states. you talk to any governor, democratic or
armed patrols were completely legal. they had studied the law, they knew at what distance they needed to stand, when the guns could not be loaded in the cars, that a felon could not carry a handgun. all the very specific legislation around when and where it was legal, and they emulated some tactics that were being done in l.a. and started to patrol the police and stand up. and in this drew a local following in oakland of young adults who said that's power. that's standing up to our press sor. we're going to join in. we're not going to just sit there and talk about revolution like the revolutionary action movement, but this gives us a way to actually stand up against brutality. when this really changed to a bigger scale, right? there were these small patrols in oakland standing up and following the police and patrolling the police, when this really changed was when a young man was killed in north richmond, an unincorporated area knot of oakland. -- north of oakland. neighbors -- he was killed by police, shot in the back, and there was a lot of evidence that this was unjustified murder.
to become law. anything they put in that bill is going to become law. the budget is a resolution. it's not binding. it is likely going to head to conference with the house republicans but even then some of the little things we saw like a vote yesterday in the senate to repeal the medical device tax in obama care, not going to be binding. so even though they took dozens and dozens, they considered more than a hundred amendments in the last 24 hours, none of those will have effect. t was mostly symbolic. host: we go to james. caller: everybody is complaining about government shutdown and all the situations we are dealing with. i want to ask the question why isn't anybody going back to the root of this situation when we got into this with president bush with illegal war. now president obama is bringing the soldiers back and the war is over. where are the funds from that to be utilized back into society and all the oil we got from you is dam hugh sane. why isn't going back to the fact the reason we got into this is what happened with bush and his administration and obama had to pull us o
clinton, who signed that into law say that d.o.m.a. should be overturned and senator rob portman is citing his familiarity with this issue, his son is gay. how do you think this is going to play out in the 2014 midterms and then subsequently 2016 general election? >> well, alex, we've seen a clear shift in public opinion on this issue over the last ten years. it's been quite dramatic. all sorts of polls now, including the reuter's poll last week shows that the public supports gay marriage even civil unions. even in the south, the majority supports gay marriage or civil unions together. democrats are united on this issue. they say it's a big winner, especially among younger voters, and there's a real sort of active debate within the republican party about how to play this. there's a lot of people saying we've got to stop emphasizing these social issues because they are not working in our favor. however, if you're going to have a divisive 2016 primary, rick santorum is going to want to talk about that and that could really hurt them. >> do you think that will be the case in 2016? if you look
would be different. i think at the end of the day if we had like a law enforcement person or former law enforcement person, or someone like that as the national face of it, it would make it easier in some of the areas or some of the states you're talking about. but i don't think bloomberg -- >> gabby giffords is participating and give a different experience. they examine at it a different way and have their own group that doesn't have the funding that bloomberg has but they have a personal touch. pretty prominent law enforcement people have come forward. i get the point about the big city divide because one of the things we hear a lot from members who live in rural states and states with duplicate roots in the hunting and sportsman community and they don't see the world in the same way a big city mayor might and they have to really deal with the issue there are many gun owners in their states who say, hey, i'm a responsible person and i wouldn't do those things and don't restrict rights they believe are their own. it gets very, very personal. when you look at a mark pryor of arkansas he
come monday. in cyprus chaos reached a fever pitch. reuters reporting it just passed laws to create a solidarity fund that would pool state assets and give government powers to impose capital controls on banks. the european central banks says cyprus has until monday to raise $7.5 billion or risk financial collapse. banks there have been closed all week and hundreds of demonstrators gathering outside of parliament protesting. it is coming down to the wire. what will this do to the markets. what should you do with your portfolio? with me now is our money power panel. senior fellow at peterson institute. lance roberts, ceo and chief economist with street advisors. pleasure having you there. we're trying to get our third guest all strapped up. i think that was spencer patton. we'll see if we have him in a bit. jacob, let me start wit you. what do you thk of these latest developments? >> well, i think they're fairly prectable actually. it is very clear that the european central bank has given cyprus an ultimatum. it basically put as gun to your head. unless you come up with a deal that q
. and the third anniversary of the signing of obamacare in law and the senate overwhelmingly to repeal the tax on medical devices and higher insurance premiums next year. and "varney & company" says this law looks like it's unravelling. is that wishful thinking? in our next hour, one of the foremost authorities and critics of obamacare will answer that question, are we stuck with it? i think you're going to like her answer to this one coming up later. now, cyprus, they have seized private wealth, and principal, destroyed cyprus as a tax haven. and overseas tax haven, that's a contentious issue. i don't think this is going to strengthen president obama's hand going after the money marketed overseas whether it's rich people or corporations? >> and he signed the foreign asset tax compliance act forcing banks in other countries to reveal who are-- who are the americans that have money and how much and that was obviously controversial. americans and europeans and other places not happy about it, but this gives him a chance to say, listen, this is-- these tax havens, they're not even safe for you, a
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